Fly Smoking

Friday 8th August 2014

We publish a post on energy storage based on cigarette butts and then tobacco raises its head again - as plane maker Boeing, South African Airways (SAA) and SkyNRG are collaborating to make sustainable aviation biofuel from a new type of tobacco plant.

Apart from a good news story for the environment with the development of a renewable aviation fuel, it is also good economic news for South African tobacco farmers, while also seeing the reduction of crops for cigarettes.

SkyNRG is expanding production of the hybrid plant known as Solaris as an energy crop that farmers could grow instead of traditional tobacco. Test farming of the plants, which are effectively nicotine-free, is underway in South Africa with biofuel production expected from large and small farms in the next few years. Initially, oil from the plant's seeds will be converted into jet fuel. In coming years, Boeing expects emerging technologies to increase South Africa's aviation biofuel production from the rest of the plant.

"By using hybrid tobacco, we can leverage knowledge of tobacco growers in South Africa to grow a marketable biofuel crop without encouraging smoking," said Ian Cruickshank, South African Airways Group Environmental Affairs Specialist. "This is another way that SAA and Boeing are driving development of sustainable biofuel while enhancing our region's economic opportunity.”

In October last year, Boeing and SAA said they would work together to develop a sustainable aviation biofuel supply chain in Southern Africa. As part of that effort, they are working with the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials to position farmers with small plots of land to grow biofuel feedstocks that provide socioeconomic value to communities without harming food supplies, fresh water or land use.

So that jet stream from planes high over your head could be tobacco smoke, but cleaner and environmentally friendly, plus being nicotine free!

Source: Boeing

Categories: General, Renewable, Reviews, Technology

Friday 8th August 2014


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