Home CHP - Video

Monday 7th July 2014

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is certainly a buzz technology that many governments and large organizations are using to improve clean energy supply - generally in large scale operations.

But wouldn’t it be great to have CHP for your home or small business - that is the aim of a Norwegian start-up GasDecEngine Technology AS (GDE), who have turned to crowd-funding to progress their micro CHP.

Their micro CHP will lower energy cost and emissions for small businesses and homes. As CHP creates energy and captures its own exhaust to reuse as a heat source, they are very efficient. Also in many countries a Feed-in-Tarriff is available, making it is possible to achieve a profit from the generated energy.

CHP is so vaunted because of its efficiency, particularly when you compare it with a typical coal-fired power plant, which converts about 30% of the coal into electricity, giving it a 30% efficiency rating. The remainder of the energy is released into the atmosphere as heat exhaust. Even more of the energy is lost when it is transferred and distributed over the grid system to the end user.

CHP engines create electricity and capture the exhaust to use as heat, making them much more efficient. And because they are located on site, there is no loss from transmission. CHP, can use conventional and renewable fuels, while reducing emissions and improving efficiency. CHP engines create electricity and capture the exhaust to use as heat, making them much more efficient. And because they are located on site, there is no loss from transmission.

Typically, CHP engines are able to convert 15% to 35% of their energy into electricity, with most of the remainder being used for internal consumption to run the engine. GDE’s engine has a mechanical efficiency for generating electricity of 62%, and a combined efficiency of 95%. This translates into lower operating costs and a higher return on investment.

GDE say their unit can use any conventional fuel source or even agricultural waste, and in the future, they plan to build their engines to accept zero-carbon energy sources such as solar, wind and geothermal energy.

Check out how their engine works and what they are looking for from crowd funding here.

Check out their video:

Categories: General, Reviews, Technology

Monday 7th July 2014


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